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Free Access to National Parks with Access Pass

What better way to enjoy and explore your abilities than to visit national parks and recreation sites throughout the United States? Persons with disabilities who are citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. may be able to obtain a free lifetime pass that allows access to over 2,000 “Federal Recreation Sites.” Here’s some info to get you started on your next adventure.

Keys to a More Inclusive Workplace

How To Create a More Inclusive Workplace

National Disability Employment Awareness Month happened in October; our hope is that the drive to create more inclusive and diverse workplaces persists beyond just one month! For non-disabled persons, it might be easy to assume that getting all the components in place for an inclusive workplace would be a daunting and difficult task. However, it's actually very straightforward—and beneficial for everyone! Here's some of the various things employers can do to get started, many of which can be done right after reading this blog.

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Starting a Business: Tips for Parents with Disabilities

After opening Hidden Manna Café, a social service agency asked Glynis Harvey and Mark Cagley about the possibility of hiring a person with disabilities. Harvey and Cagley, parents of twin sons with autism, understand that it is difficult for people with disabilities to find employment. They also know how hard disabled persons work once they secure a job. Harvey’s responded to this question of employing disabled persons with “As long as you are willing to work, we are willing to work with you.”

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For many Americans, finding the right home is a long and arduous process. There are so many things to take into consideration, from the location to the price to the school district, and when you’re a senior or an individual who is living with a disability, making sure the home is accessible is one of the most important aspects of the hunt.

 

It has been documented that Chicago is one of the best diversity and inclusion cities in the United States regarding all facets of disability. Recently, the Chicago’s Mayor's Office for People for People with Disabilities has focused on bringing together disability leadership through the Chicago Community Trust with the program ADA25 Leadership Institute.

On December 7th, 2017, Helene Gayle, CEO of The Chicago Community Trust alongside Karen Tamley, Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities, announced the 2018 ADA 25 Advancing Leadership Fellows Class. The initiative is composed of three facets:

The opportunity for people with disabilities to become leaders in the workplace is a chance not to show your skills, but to provide a team with insight, confidence and excellent networking in the city of Chicago. When the inaugural group of the ADA25 Advancing Leadership program was launched 2 years ago, I saw such a great opportunity for people with disabilities and the civic engagement community to learn from each other, and the chance to learn about all facets of diversity.

The Chicago Community Trust diversity pipeline does not just talk about people with disabilities, but diversity encompasses race, gender, ethnic groups, age, personality, tenure, organizational function, education and background.

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With our low unemployment rate across the board for US citizens, people with disabilities have been seeing results that bring optimism in finding not just a job, but an ideal job. After missing out on an opportunity that you were excited about, rejection seeps in and it is tough for anyone to be rejected.

As you have that sinking feeling of rejection, you are not alone. Many business leaders have been rejected many times with their ideas, only to analyze what can be better in their ideas or even abandoned the idea altogether. When it boils down to is, successful people extract lessons from rejection, not stew about it.

There are many questions you can ask internally that would have made you the best candidate to fill the position.

Job and Career Resources

Resources for Choosing a Career or Job Goal

Occupational Outlook Handbook tells you the training and education needed for hundreds of different kinds of jobs as well as what you would earn, expected job prospects, what workers do on the job and working conditions. In addition, the Handbook gives you job search tips and information about the job market in each State by occupation type.
Starting Your Own Business

Starting your own business or becoming self-employed is a major undertaking and being successful requires a good deal of thought and planning. These resources will help you get started. Abilities Fund The Abilities Fund is the only nationwide program designed exclusively to advance entrepreneurial opportunities for people with disabilities. After completing a detailed application form, Abilities Fund staff will contact you to offer support and resources that are specific to your situation. Small Business Start-up Guide

Post Secondary Education and Training Programs

If you are thinking about returning to school or getting some job training or placement assistance, here are some valuable resources. Colleges and Universities The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) College Navigator can help you find the right college. NCES is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations. American Job Centers Services Locator (Sponsored by Department of Labor)

Bureau of Labor Statistics

Healthcare jobs are among the fastest growing occupations in the economy. You should consider this fact when looking for jobs or making decisions about pursuing job training or additional education.

You can search for healthcare jobs and other fast growing occupations on AbilityLinks by Occupation Type or Key Words that identify your skills and experience.

View a list of fastest growing occupations.

 

 

Americans with Disabilities Act

What is a Disability? The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines an individual with a disability as someone who:

Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities (such as walking, seeing, hearing, learning, and working); Has a history of such an impairment or; Is regarded as having such impairment.

Remember that not all disabilities are visible or readily apparent. Physical or mental conditions such as diabetes, epilepsy, low vision, and learning disabilities like dyslexia, can also present significant barriers to employment.

How Do I Know If My Worksite Is Accessible?

The following questions will help you determine the accessibility of your work site. Sources of additional and more detailed information are provided at the end.

According to a Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) report from August, 2014, 31.8% of non disabled persons do not participate in the labor force vs. an 80.2% non participation rate for persons with disabilities. The unemployment rate for disabled job seekers is also more than twice as high. The BLS reports a September 2014 unemployment rate of 12.3% for disabled job seekers vs. 5.5% for non-disabled job seekers. Two studies offer some insight into why so many persons with disabilities are not working and what businesses are doing to employ and accommodate workers with disabilities:

 

Why Adults With Disabilities Have Difficulty Finding Jobs

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