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I’ll begin with a reminder that this article is written specifically from the perspective of an individual with an obvious physical disability, who self-identifies by nature and choice as an individual with a disability.  Not everyone who has a disability is readily identifiable as a disabled person, for myriad different reasons.  For example, their disability may not be physical, visually recognizable, or they may choose to obscure or deny the conditions and precepts of their disability.  This is their choice, and they are free to make it.  However, an argument will be made in this...


As a professional and a job seeker with a disability, I’m often confronted with a work environment that becomes a challenge for me to consistently successfully navigate because of unique difficulties imposed by my disability.  My disability is Cerebral Palsy, and the individual issues that I need to recognize and circumvent on a daily basis are physical in nature, centered on mobility.  This is the perspective through which I will summarize and investigate reasonable accommodation within the workplace, however, I’d...


AbilityLinks is hosting a virtual job fair Tuesday, March 25 to Thursday, March 27, 2014, one of three virtual job fairs scheduled for 2014. Here are some answers to common questions employers, service providers and persons with disabilities have about the job fair.

 

Is there a fee?

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I am a chronic procrastinator. Does that sound like you, too? Do you frequently open up your Internet browser, intending only to check your "most important" websites, only to suddenly look down and realize four hours have passed and you haven't gotten ANY work done? If so, you're not alone! 

Many people use the Internet as a distraction device, even if it's what they're meant to be using to get their work done. According to a Salary.com survey in 2012, up to 64% of people say they visit non-work related websites while at work! Not only does this...


Bill O'Connor, editors note: Our intern, Lauren Bryant, discusses this important day for people with disabilities and how it affects those searching for employment.

January 20th is known as Martin Luther King Day, celebrating the Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr. A lesser known fact is that January 20th is also the International Day of Acceptance, a day for all those with disabilities and their loved ones to celebrate acceptance and understanding. 

The International Day of Acceptance (IDoA) was the creation of Annie Hopkins, a woman with...


 

 I'm going to run a little experiment. I want all of you reading this to ask anyone, anyone at all, the following question: “Hey, have you heard of this website called Tumblr?” What was their response? 

I can almost guarantee that 90% or so of those people you asked, responded with: “What the heck is Tumblr?” 

Tumblr is a micro-blogging website that can best be described (in my opinion) as...


On October 8-10, AbilityLinks kicked off National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) with a virtual job fair.

One of the posters for this year's NDEAM theme

Thank you to the 30 employers and 133 job-seekers who helped make it a success! Job-seekers from 18 states logged on to attend during the three-day event, but if you missed it, you can still check out the 134 new jobs posted.

Participating employers included Acquirent; Acxiom; American Academy of Pediatrics; Americaneagle.com;...


 

“Today, Americans with disabilities are facing disproportionately high rates of unemployment compared to Americans without disabilities,” said Jack Markell, National Governors Association Chair, in his letter from 2012 announcing the initiative “A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities.” The initiative began last year, and this month, the NGA published a follow-up report in the form of a blueprint for companies. The intent of the format was to encourage businesses and government to apply it as a model for inclusive employment...


A new exhibit at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has “everybody” talking: EveryBody: An Artifact History of Disability in America. With a considerate nod to the subject content, the museum has chosen to make the exhibit accessible online, enabling people with disabilities to view it at their convenience. It’s available in both English and Spanish, broadening the access even more.

On the museum's blog, curator Katherine Ott observes: “People with disabilities have been present throughout American history, but rarely appear in...


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